Difference between revisions of "Pinebook Pro Software Release"

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Slightly improved formatting
(Slightly improved formatting)
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Log into your host device as root with the following command:
Log into your host device as root with the following command:
sudo su
sudo su
Enter your password.
Enter your password.
Let the device on which you intend to install gentoo be refered to hereafter as /dev/<gentoo>. Use the following command to prepare this disk for installation:
Let the device on which you intend to install gentoo be refered to hereafter as /dev/<gentoo>. Use the following command to prepare this disk for installation:
fdisk -B /dev/<gentoo> #Don't just copy these commands! You should substitute <gentoo> for mmcblk2 for the internal eMMC flash storage
fdisk -B /dev/<gentoo> #Don't just copy these commands! You should substitute <gentoo> for mmcblk2 for the internal eMMC flash storage
Note that the first block of the boot partition is block 62500. Delete all partitions, but *do not* re-format the disk. Create a new boot partition starting at 62500, and as it's size select "+1GB". Create a new swap partition. fdisk will try to start it at the beginning of the volume (before the boot partition) Instead, when it prompts you for the starting position, enter in the end sector of the boot partition. It should then tell you that this is within an existing partition, and recommend a slightly higher value. Press enter, and give for the size of the partition any value greater than "+4gb". You need this much ram to be able to suspend your system, and emerge large packages. Don't be stingey - you still have SD cards. I reccomend "+8gb".
Note that the first block of the boot partition is block 62500. Delete all partitions, but *do not* re-format the disk. Create a new boot partition starting at 62500, and as it's size select "+1GB". Create a new swap partition. fdisk will try to start it at the beginning of the volume (before the boot partition) Instead, when it prompts you for the starting position, enter in the end sector of the boot partition. It should then tell you that this is within an existing partition, and recommend a slightly higher value. Press enter, and give for the size of the partition any value greater than "+4gb". You need this much ram to be able to suspend your system, and emerge large packages. Don't be stingey - you still have SD cards. I reccomend "+8gb".
Finally, add a root partition starting at the end sector of the swap partition, and use the rest of the disk for it. That should be 50-60 GB depending on the size of your swap and boot partitions.
Finally, add a root partition starting at the end sector of the swap partition, and use the rest of the disk for it. That should be 50-60 GB depending on the size of your swap and boot partitions.
Lastly, use
Lastly, use
t, 1, 6      #Type, boot, vfat
t, 1, 6      #Type, boot, vfat
t, 2, 82,    #Type, swap, swap
t, 2, 82,    #Type, swap, swap
t, 3, 83      #Type, root, ext4
t, 3, 83      #Type, root, ext4
to set the partition types of the three partitions.
to set the partition types of the three partitions.


use the command:
use the command:
lsblk
lsblk
to remind yourself which disk is /dev/<gentoo>
to remind yourself which disk is /dev/<gentoo>
Write the filesystems to these three partitions with the commands:
Write the filesystems to these three partitions with the commands:
mkfs.vfat /dev/<gentoo>p1 #This may be a slightly different format if you're installing to a usb stick.
mkfs.vfat /dev/<gentoo>p1 #This may be a slightly different format if you're installing to a usb stick.
mkswap /dev/<gentoo>p2
mkswap /dev/<gentoo>p2
mkfs.ext4 /dev/<gentoo>p3
mkfs.ext4 /dev/<gentoo>p3


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