Difference between revisions of "Pinebook Pro Software Release"

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(Added bootloader instructions)
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Installing a functional bootloader can be difficult. Luckily, the tow-boot project provides a UEFI-like experience for some arm-based devices. Furthermore, it is not neccesary install this bootloader manually, as it will continue to be useable even after the disk has been reformatted, as long as the bootloader remains unscathed.
Installing a functional bootloader can be difficult. Luckily, the tow-boot project provides a UEFI-like experience for some arm-based devices. Furthermore, it is not neccesary install this bootloader manually, as it will continue to be useable even after the disk has been reformatted, as long as the bootloader remains unscathed.


No-matter where you intend to install gentoo, the bootloader should always be installed on the eMMC flash, although technically the SD card slot could also be used. Either way, install any of the official Manjaro arm disk images to the internal eMMC. You may use a second operating system installed on an SD-card, or the official Pine64 eMMC USB adapter. Boot into this operating system to ensure that the bootloader functions, but after that you have no further need of it. You have the bootloader and that's what's important.
https://manjaro.org/downloads/arm/pinebook-pro/arm8-pinebook-pro-minimal/
 
No-matter where you intend to install gentoo, the bootloader should always be installed on the eMMC flash, although technically the SD card slot could also be used. Either way, install any of the official Manjaro arm disk images to the internal eMMC (there's no reason not to use the minimal image, as you will not be using this OS for anything). You may use a second operating system installed on an SD-card, or the official Pine64 eMMC USB adapter. Boot into this operating system to ensure that the bootloader functions, but after that you have no further need of it.
 
Next, if you already have an OS on an SD card, you can use that for installing gentoo. If you don't, you may be pleasantly suprised to find that tow-boot is cabable of booting from a USB drive. Therefore, you may install the same Manjaro image to your USB drive or SD card, and select it from the boot menu. You should now have an unused but bootable OS on the eMMC, and another bootable, usable OS on your external storage.
 
'''Preparing the Disks'''
 
Log into your host device as root with the following command:
sudo su
Enter your password.
Let the device on which you intend to install gentoo be refered to hereafter as /dev/<gentoo>. Use the following command to prepare this disk for installation:
fdisk -B /dev/<gentoo> #Don't just copy these commands! You should substitute <gentoo> for mmcblk2 for the internal eMMC flash storage
Note that the first block of the boot partition is block 62500. Delete all partitions, but *do not* re-format the disk. Create a new boot partition starting at 62500, and as it's size select "+1GB". Create a new swap partition. fdisk will try to start it at the beginning of the volume (before the boot partition) Instead, when it prompts you for the starting position, enter in the end sector of the boot partition. It should then tell you that this is within an existing partition, and recommend a slightly higher value. Press enter, and give for the size of the partition any value greater than "+4gb". You need this much ram to be able to suspend your system, and emerge large packages. Don't be stingey - you still have SD cards. I reccomend "+8gb".
Finally, add a root partition starting at the end sector of the swap partition, and use the rest of the disk for it. That should be 50-60 GB depending on the size of your swap and boot partitions.
Lastly, use
t, 1, 6      #Type, boot, vfat
t, 2, 82,    #Type, swap, swap
t, 3, 83      #Type, root, ext4
to set the partition types of the three partitions.
 
use the command:
lsblk
to remind yourself which disk is /dev/<gentoo>
Write the filesystems to these three partitions with the commands:
mkfs.vfat /dev/<gentoo>p1 #This may be a slightly different format if you're installing to a usb stick.
mkswap /dev/<gentoo>p2
mkfs.ext4 /dev/<gentoo>p3
 
'''Chrooting'''


== Kali Linux ==
== Kali Linux ==

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